Ringed Spiral Galaxy NGC 4725
Galaxies contain such huge amounts of matter and energy, that statistical variations might be expected to cancel out.  In other words, one might expect the fundamental
laws of physics might allow only one or just a few forms of galaxies.  Yet each galaxy is unique in size, shape, and composition.  The Galaxy NGC 4725 at first glance
is just another spiral galaxy.  Yet closer inspection shows broad stretching of the core, not quite into a barred spiral, yet not a traditional spiral either.  Furthermore,
the central arms do not spiral, but form a ring.  NGC 4725 has one of the most perfect rings of any galaxy, appearing oval to our view because of a 43 degree tilt
from our line of sight.  Active star formation in the ring appears blue-white from bright clusters of young hot stars.  Beyond the ring, two faint concentric arms spriral
outwards.

NGC 4725 is one of the brightest galaxies omitted from Messier's catalog, shining at magnitude 9.4 at a distance of 42 million light-years, in the constellation Coma
Berenices.

The luminance for this image was obtained with 225 minutes exposure with an ST10XME camera and AP 0.67x reducer through a 12" Meade LX200R telescope.  
The color channels were obtained with an ST2000XM camera through a TEC 140 mm refractor, with 50 minutes red, 70 minutes green, and 90 minutes blue
exposures. .
Music:  Ring of Fire, Johnny Cash
click on image for full size